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  1. Answered- Is it ok to leave my dog with friends when I travel?

    When ever I travel, I take Benni to doggy daycare so somebody can take care of him. It's a lot cheaper to just leave him with friends but then he doesn't interact with other dogs. Which is better?

    41 votes
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      0 comments  ·  Dog Ownership  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →

      Vanessa Woods, Author of The Genius of Dogs, answered this months question. Enjoy!

      That’s a fantastic question, and lucky for us, there is research that may be able to shed some light on it! In a study by Dr. David Tuber at Ohio State University, researchers looked at the expression of stress hormones when dogs were placed in a strange new context, in this case an unfamiliar room.

      What they found was that when dogs were alone, their stress level went up significantly. The scientists were able to detect this due to a spike in stress hormones. Furthermore, the researchers found that even when dogs were with a familiar dog in the unfamiliar room, their stress hormones still spiked up. However, when placed in the unfamiliar room with a familiar human the dog had little to no increase in stress hormones. Throughout the time in the room, the dog stayed…

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        0 comments  ·  Dog Ownership  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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          0 comments  ·  Dog Ownership  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →

          Your question has been answered by Dr. Brian Hare:

          You shouldn’t worry about your dog going first through a doorway or any other signs of ‘dominant behavior’. The idea that you should be the alpha dog is based outdated wolf research, which studies now show does not apply to dogs.

          For a long time many people thought that because dogs evolved from wolves, wolves were a good model to understand dog behavior. Although they do share much of the same DNA, we have since learned that their pack structures and social behavior are actually very different.

          If you look at packs of feral dogs, or dogs who live without human interference, research shows that they look to the dog with the most friends. There is no single dominant pair that uses violence and dominant behavior, instead when deciding where to go feral dogs follow the dog with the largest…

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